Saudi King paid 1$ billion to help army remove Morsi

Saudi government is now very much concerned that Sisi has failed to establish the new setting in Egy
Saudi government is now very much concerned that Sisi has failed to establish the new setting in Egy
Saudi political activist, known as Mujtahidd, has revealed that Al Saud government has helped Egyptian defense minister with one billion dollars to topple former president Mohamed Morsi.

Mujtahid who has gathered lots of attention for his Twitter campaign against Saudi government, said in his latest tweets that Commander-in-Chief of Egyptian armed forces General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi who is also country’s defense minister, received a one billion dollar aid from Saudi Arabia for removing Morsi from power on July 3.

Mujtahid wrote Saudi government is now very much concerned that Sisi has failed to establish the new setting in Egypt successfully, as millions of Morsi supporters continue their week-long protests throughout Egypt calling for his return.

“King Abdullah knows well that failure of the coup in Egypt will be a disaster for Al Saud because any new government will be stronger and will adopt anti-Saudi Arabia policies,” he wrote.

He added, “That is why King Abdullah is one of the supporters of unlimited use of force in cracking down protesters, even if it leads to killing of thousands and even tens of thousands of people”.

“King Abdullah not only supported the coup and tried to convince others to accept new changes, he also helped Sisi not to worry about his most important concerns,” Mujtahid said.

He continued, “Sisi was worried that the crisis would break down the economy and this would hurt reputation of the coup, therefore King Abdullah pledged to help him receive enough aid to crack down supporters of the law”.

Mujtahid believed what the Egyptian army has received up until now is just a small part of what has been promised by the Saudi regime and according to his findings “much more is on the way”.

He said Saudi King is using his political, financial and media powers to convince US and European officials not to adopt strong stances toward the crisis in Egypt and make as much comments only enough to persuade public opinion in their own countries.

Even though Morsi was removed from power by the force of the army, none of the Western government has recognized it as a coup.

The US administration made a technically legal move to decide not to decide if the Egyptian military's ouster of the country's first democratically elected president was a "coup."

"The law does not require us to make a formal determination ... as to whether a coup took place, and it is not in our national interest to make such a determination," State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said on Friday.

SHI/SHI